Hey everyone, freestyling is to me a big part of rapping, probably my favorite thing about it tbh so I wanted to bring a bit more attention to it. Not only it’s an extremely fun activity but it helps with flow and delivery a lot. Lyrics as well, you can say that freestyling and regular rapping of written lyrics go hand in hand and build on each other.

In the video below you can see me and a friend going at it and having tons of fun. You probably won’t understand much since it’s in a foreign language but you should be able to feel out the flows and the positive vibe.

You may have noticed that one task of the flow course (found on the main page) is about freestyling. In the course you get to learn about the 4 Pillars of Freestyle Rap, and as a trailer to that I will talk about the first one in here.

The 1st Pillar of Freestyle Rap is to play a beat and try to rap over it but don’t worry about the flow or using rhymes. What you need to try is to keep making sense i.e. basically simulating a normal chat with a friend and pretty much rap with no rhymes. Of course, if some come to your head, that’s cool too. An easy way to try this is to talk about how your day went or maybe rap about some movie or something, a subject that you know well. You can maybe try to rap about a cooking receipt and explain the steps. Think of it as talking with a friend but it involves a beat. And instead of talking you’re going for a more rapped way of saying words.

This first pillar is designed so that you train to keep your focus and build on maintaining sense.

You can even record something and I would give you feedback.

Related Posts

Showing 11 comments
  • Judy Wilson
    Reply

    Thanks for going over these pillars of freestyle rap. I’ve always liked rap music, but I have trouble with coming up with lyrics and rhymes on the spot. I liked your tip to keep a beat and try to rap over it but not to worry about the flow or using rhymes. Hopefully that will help me get some practice so that I can be a better rapper.

    • iLegion
      iLegion
      Reply

      if you keep practicing with freestyle it always works sooner or later and you will just be able to stop thinking entirely about the rhymes, they’ll come to your head. And when that happens you can give some thought to flow in the process!

    • DemoKingz
      DemoKingz
      Reply

      Sounds good man, and yeah that’s a great practice. Just try it out and you’ll see benefits for sure. Make sure you practice rapping on the regular though, like do it daily with occasional 10-20 days breaks so that your brain gets a refreshment on the rap thing ๐Ÿ™‚ You can do that every 6 months or so, but in the meantime daily practice it is. It doesn’t have to be that much, but at least 20-30 min a day. Of course, I’d also urge you to check out the flow course so that you get a cut on the learning curve ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Benjaminrhymes
    Reply

    What are the tips on how to rap fast like Mac lethal

    • DemoKingz
      DemoKingz
      Reply

      I am personally not a fan of fast rapping so I don’t advocate it or teach it ๐Ÿ™‚ Or actually I’m talking more about double time rapping, rapping fast on fast beats is completely fine with me.

    • dealz jawalha
      Reply

      Find a rap song you know REALLY well that isn’t too fast. Memorize the lyrics. Get it so you can rap it perfectly along with the record. Then go to youtube and change the speed of the song to 1.25, and rap along. Do that until you get it perfect. Change the speed to 1.5. Rinse and repeat until you can rap it perfectly at 1.5, then move onto 2 and follow the same process (if you can, some songs are simply too fast at 2x speed to rap along to, but most arent). Once you can do it at 2x speed, move onto a different song (preferably one thats slightly faster).

      If you have trouble slurring your words as you get faster practice tongue twisters, they’ll really help make your pronunciation more accurate.

  • ELL CAFE
    Reply

    I like your its one of those that an upcoming rapper like me needs

  • Trigs
    Reply

    Don’t pull a Kevin

  • J Eastwood
    Reply

    Thanks for the advice, it’s really appreciated! As for he foreign language , it doesn’t hinder a thing, music is universal after all. We understand the heart of the music, despite language.

    • DemoKingz
      DemoKingz
      Reply

      Great way to put it man, and I agree, at the very least you can always feel the vibe and the emotion.

      And I’m glad if the info was of help, thanks for checking it out.

Leave a Comment